With the proliferation of online dating services, do we just have too much choice?

Rates of single-person households – the majority of which, researchers believe, are occupied by a person not in a relationship – have risen sharply since the 1970s.

According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics, the number will continue to increase by around 63 per cent over the next 20 years or so, from 2.1 million households in 2011 to almost 3.4 million in 2036.

The app is available in over 30 languages now and majority owned by Inter Active Corp (IAC).

By March 2014, the app had generated one billion matches, 800m swipes and 10m matches per day, as well as 300 marriage proposals.

According to Nielsen Research, 74 per cent of singles in Australia are content with their relationship status.

Nevertheless, 63 per cent were still hedging their bets on online matchmaking, saying they have used or would consider dating sites or apps.

“Whereas women I find are a lot pickier and most of the men that I've spoken to about it are pretty open about saying that they will just say yes until they get a yes.” Warren Giffin, a 53 year-old school teacher laments the mystery of older forms of dating, where a potential match wasn’t ruled out so quickly.

“When we used to date when we were in our 20s like it was all just a mystery and that was sort of the excitement of it,” he says.

Brazil is Tinder’s third largest user base, following the US and UK.