With horizontal segregation, occupational sex segregation occurs as men and women are thought to possess different physical, emotional, and mental capabilities.

These different capabilities make the genders vary in the types of jobs they are suited for.

These changes are influenced by the male sex hormone testosterone, which increases visuospatial memory in both genders when administered.

From birth males and females are raised differently and experience different environments throughout their lives.

Even when such characteristics of jobs and workers are controlled for, the presence of women within a certain occupation leads to lower wages.

This earnings discrimination is considered to be a part of pollution theory.

93% of workplace deaths (fatal occupational injuries) in the US between 19 were men (97,053 deaths).

The male fatality rate (8.6 per 100,000 workers) was 11 times greater than the female death rate of the 1980-97 time range (0.8).

This theory suggests that jobs which are predominated by women offer lower wages than do jobs simply because of the presence of women within the occupation.

As women enter an occupation, this reduces the amount of prestige associated with the job and men subsequently leave these occupations.

The norm of blue is for boys and pink is for girls is cultural and has not always historically been around.